Unsavory Pun
What people who don’t write don’t understand is that they think you make up the line consciously — but you don’t. It proceeds from your unconscious. So it’s the same surprise to you when it emerges as it is to the audience when the comic says it. I don’t think of the joke and then say it. I say it and then realize what I’ve said. And I laugh at it, because I’m hearing it for the first time myself.
Woody Allen (via parislemon)

rumblefishx:

danceabletragedy:

Van Gogh’s Paintings Get Tilt-Shifted by Serena Malyon

Serena Malyon, a 3rd-year student at art school, took some of van Gogh’s most beautiful paintings and altered them in Photoshop to achieved this amazing tilt-shift effect.

Fantastic

archimaps:

Hugh Ferriss’s design for a bus terminal

archimaps:

Hugh Ferriss’s design for a bus terminal

kennychesneyserious:

"Have Mercy, Bitch" - Uncle Jesse Pinkman

kennychesneyserious:

"Have Mercy, Bitch" - Uncle Jesse Pinkman

chels:

explore-blog:

SW: How did you predict all of this stuff, Ray, how did you predict all of these technologies?

RB: The secret of life is being in love, and by being in love, you predict yourself. Whatever you want is whatever you get. You don’t predict things, you make them. You gotta be a Zen Buddhist, like me: Don’t think about things, just do them; don’t predict them, just make them.

You predict yourself. You don’t predict things, you make them. 

If it can be destroyed by the truth, it deserves to be destroyed by the truth.
Carl Sagan (via girlfriendandgirlfriend)
npr:

It’s your neck that’s the problem. Your neck is lying to you.
All your life you’ve had to look up at the stars. You walk along on a summer’s evening and they’re always there, those stars, those bright mysterious points of light, waiting for you to notice, waiting for you to understand what they are saying about time and space and your own place in it all.
But to see them you have to crane your neck. You have tilt back that big stone of a head to look up. Lets face it, that’s uncomfortable. And more to the point you can’t really sustain that head-craned-back position for anything more than a few minutes. That’s why the only way to really understand the real truth of the stars is to lie down.
First you’ll need to find a nice place, somewhere with the darkest skies possible. It’s got to be a good place to lie down too, someplace comfortable. A wide-open field is best. Then, once you have settled down in your dark, quiet spot take a long deep breath and face out.
That’s right, outwards, not up!
Wait, what? Read the rest on NPR’s 13.7 Cosmos and Culture blog.
(Photo: John Colosimo/ESO)

npr:

It’s your neck that’s the problem. Your neck is lying to you.

All your life you’ve had to look up at the stars. You walk along on a summer’s evening and they’re always there, those stars, those bright mysterious points of light, waiting for you to notice, waiting for you to understand what they are saying about time and space and your own place in it all.

But to see them you have to crane your neck. You have tilt back that big stone of a head to look up. Lets face it, that’s uncomfortable. And more to the point you can’t really sustain that head-craned-back position for anything more than a few minutes. That’s why the only way to really understand the real truth of the stars is to lie down.

First you’ll need to find a nice place, somewhere with the darkest skies possible. It’s got to be a good place to lie down too, someplace comfortable. A wide-open field is best. Then, once you have settled down in your dark, quiet spot take a long deep breath and face out.

That’s right, outwards, not up!

Wait, what? Read the rest on NPR’s 13.7 Cosmos and Culture blog.

(Photo: John Colosimo/ESO)

nprfreshair:

Beautiful contrast of hard and soft, light and dark, open and closed in Indonesia.

nprfreshair:

Beautiful contrast of hard and soft, light and dark, open and closed in Indonesia.

thefrogman:

 Incredible Long Exposure Photographs Shot from Orbit

Wonderful long exposure photographs taken by astronaut Don Pettit. While there are many photos like these taken from the perspective of the Earth’s surface, Pettit’s images are unique in that they incorporate the passing blur of entire illuminated cities, aurora, and the sporadic flashes of lightening from thunderstorms. Check out many more photos from the series here.

Credit: Don Pettit/NASA

[h/t: spaceplasma]